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Local Group Munich
How to get here
Most tourists arrive in Munich by either train or plane. The Munich Airport (MUC) is 40km from Munich centre, and is served by the S-Bahn local trains.

Please have a look here at the map of Munich's S-Bahn lines, the airport is serviced by the light-blue line S1 and the yellow line S8, the airport is in the top-right corner of this map: http://tinyurl.com/munich-metro2012

The Munich public transport authority is called MVV and you can look up connections on the English version of the MVV website.


NB* Unless you are saving well over 100 euro and/or the flight times are a lot more suitable, it is advisable not to fly in to Memmingen Airport if your final destination is Munich. Although this small airport does have a extremely pleasant character with an excellent Biergarten close by, the buses to Munich Central station (Hauptbahnhof) do not run that regularly and the trip takes almost two hours in total. If you book online in advance it's €16 each way, Thus, even though the flight may be cheaper, you are adding four hours to your travelling time and spending €32 on the bus.

Munich Airport has a direct S-Bahn railway link to the city which is fully integrated with the Munich underground (U-Bahn) and bus service. The extra cost to fly into Munich direct will usually be worth it.

There are two surburban-type railway train (= S-Bahn) lines, S1 and S8, that get you into town in around 45 mins.
There is a train every 10 minutes. The trains run from 4am to 1:30am.

Tickets can be purchased either at the manned counter in the central area between the two terminals, near the top of the escalators that lead to the tracks or from any ticket machine.

You can buy either:

a single ticket for 1 person at 11€ ( Single-Tageskarte-Gesamtnetz , in English: Single Day Ticket Entire Network or Single-Airport-City-Day-Ticket), or
a group ticket at 20€ ( Partner-Tageskarte-Gesamtnetz , in English: Partner Day Ticket Entire Network or Partner-Airport-City-Day-Ticket), which allows up to 5 Adults (two children between 6-14yrs count as one adult, children under 6 travel free) to travel together on one ticket

Both tickets allow unlimited transportation on the MVV Network from the time they're stamped until 6 a.m. the next day. Airport-City-Tickets come out of the ticket machine already stamped and therefore are the only tickets that do not need to be stamped.

Tickets can also be purchased for different zones of the MVV Network, should your hotel not be in the city centre.
For further information terms and conditions see http://www.mvv-muenchen.de/en/tickets...

These tickets cover not only S-Bahn trains, but also buses, underground trains (= U-Bahn), and trams (streetcars) within the MVV Network.

To find the S-Bahn train station at the airport, follow signs with a white "S" on a green background.
If arriving at the Star Alliance terminal 2, walk across a covered courtyard to get to the escalator down to the tracks, or continue above ground into the central area to the manned ticket counter.
You can also buy your tickets in Terminal 2 itself from a ticket machine.
The train station is located in the central area (indicated by a "Z") between terminal 1 and terminal 2.
There is a manned counter where you can buy tickets at the top of the escalators which go down to the tracks in the central area. You can also buy tickets at one of the ticket machines there. All ticket machines have menus in major languages, including English.
They accept both credit cards (without the need of a PIN code) and euro cash in the form of coins or banknotes up to 20€.

Warning: Once purchased the ticket should be "cancelled" in one of the stamp machines (small blue box on a pedestal or you may be subject to a fine. It only has to be cancelled once, before its first use, at the start of journey. Also, the automated kiosks that sell them have as their default pre-validated tickets that are valid for only 4 hours. If you want to buy tickets in advance (for example when returning to the airport), you need to specially select non-validated tickets -- or the tickets will no longer be valid when you go to use them. It wil be impossible to get a refund for the unused expired tickets.

Since the airport is not exactly close to the city center, another possibility is to take a taxi or limousine. Not cheap but if you are in group, affordable and certainly the more comfortable option.
Insurance and Visa
Living
Accommodation
Renting (long term)
For people who are going to study in your university, where is it possible to find accommodation (student housing association, university dorms, private tenants). Please provide some useful links when looking for accommodation.
Hostels
Best Hostels and recommendations
Hosting
In case you're interested in being hosted by someone from the Local Group, please check the information on the ESTIEM Hosting Platform or contact the Local Responsible through lr.Munich@estiem.org or hosting.Munich@estiem.org
Transportation
Public Transportation
Munich is very much a walkable city, but there are many other means of transportation.
The Munich Transport and Tariff Association (MVV) consists of several methods of transportation: S-Bahn, U-Bahn, tram, city bus, and regional bus.

The web-page of the public-transport-company in Munich (MVV) is http://www.mvv-muenchen.de/ (also in English). On this website, you can find the appropriate ticket for your traveling needs. You can also plan journeys using as the start and/or end point normal street addresses, so you don't have to know the name of the stop nearest to your hotel.

Example of a ticket choice: If you are staying in Munich for several days and are sightseeing in the city, you might consider buying a 3-day partner pass (covers the inner zone/white zone only and is valid for up to 5 adults).
A CityTourCard is also available to visitors of Munich. It includes public transportation and discounts in Munich. Click here to find out more about the CityTourCard. There are many other ticket options where you can choose a specific zone to travel within.

Before getting the CityTourCard which is more expensive than normal MVV public transport tickets that just cover the transport it's a good idea to check their list of discounts and add see whether it won't be cheaper to just get cheaper MVV tickets and pay full price entry fees:
Overview of MVV Partner Day Tickets: http://www.mvv-muenchen.de/en/tickets...
Overview of MVV Single Day tickets: http://www.mvv-muenchen.de/en/tickets...

Explanation of districts:
To see in which district a stop is where you want to go, have a look at this map of Munich public transport. The districts are shaded in the below colours: http://tinyurl.com/munich-metro2012

■ Inner district (Innenraum) - white zone
■ Munich XXL (München XXL) - white and green zone, includes Dachau
■ Outer district (Außenraum) - green, yellow and red zone
■ Entire network (Gesamtnetz) - all four zones. You will need this if you want to go to/from Munich airport (it's 40km from the centre)


Travel within Bavaria

For travelling around Bayern you can use the "Bayern Ticket". The Bayern Ticket is valid on all public transport in Bayern including the Deutsche Bahn network (with the exception of the ICE and IC Trains). This includes all Regional Trains, Buses and City networks (e.g. includes MVV Network in Munich and similar networks in Augsburg and Nürnberg). These tickets can also be purchased for a Single Person or as a Partner version for a group of up to 5 persons (or parents or 1 parent or grandparent with unlimited kids).

This ticket is also valid as far as Salzburg and Kufstein and therefore ideal for a group day trip. They are valid from 0900 Mon-Fri until 0300 the following morning from day of purchase. Weekends and official holidays they are valid from Midnight until 0300 the following morning from day of purchase.
 
Private Transportation
Another type of transportation in Munich is carsharing where you will be able to pickup a car in the city and drive where you need to go here are the most popular companies in Munich

DriveNow

Car2Go .
Travel
Touristic spots
BMW Welt

If you worship at the altar of the automobile, you’ll want to make a beeline for this ‘cathedral of cars’ near the Olympic Stadium. Sitting right next to the actual BMW plant, BMW Welt is essentially a vast showroom where you can admire the company’s entire current product palette from sedans to Minis, racing cars to electric vehicles and even Rolls Royce coaches. The futuristic building itself is a jaw-dropper, all glass and steel twisted into a double cone and lidded by a roof reminiscent of a floating cloud.

Museum Sundays

Ok, it’s not completely free, but for cash-strapped culture lovers, the long-standing ‘one euro Sunday’ admission policy at about a dozen of Munich’s finest museums is a gift. Among your options are: admiring Rembrandt, Monet and Warhol at the prestigious Pinakothek art galleries (Alte Pinakothek, Neue Pinakothek and Pinakothek der Moderne); studying finely chiselled Greek marble statues at the Glyptothek; or feasting your eyes on Renaissance sculpture at the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum.

Hofbräuhaus

A pilgrimage to Hofbräuhaus, the world’s most famous beer hall, is a must for every Munich visitor. Even if you don’t feel like downing giant mugs of amber liquid, no one is going to stop you from wandering beneath painted vaulted ceilings around the warren of halls, marvelling at the drunken shenanigans or clapping to the oompah bands. The huge, flag-festooned banquet hall upstairs is where the National Socialist Party held its first large gathering on 24 February 1920. Alas, the free historical exhibit in the gallery above the stage does not address this milestone event.

Englischer Garten

Sure, most parks are free, but then few are like Munich’s Englischer Garten (English Garden), which is bigger than London’s Hyde Park and New York’s Central Park. Find your way to the little lake to take a boat for a spin or stake out some turf on the manicured lawns for sunbathing (au naturel, if you dare). Other enchanting escapes from the city hubbub are the Japanese teahouse, a Greek-style temple with grand views and, well yes, several beer gardens. The most famous – and one of Munich’s oldest – sprawls around the exotic Chinesischer Turm (Chinese Tower), a five-tiered wooden pagoda. Giselastrasse is a handy U-Bahn stop.

Eisbach surfers

Munich is famous for beer, sausages and...river surfing. Yes, you read that right. Just go to the southern tip of the Englischer Garten at Prinzregentenstrasse and you'll see scores of people leaning over a bridge to cheer on wetsuit-clad daredevils as they 'hang 10' on a rolling wave in the fast-flowing Eisbach, a 2km-long creek running through the giant park. Rocks, strong currents and the constricted space make surfing here a rather dangerous endeavour that, in fact, only became legal in 2010. Don’t even think about getting in the water unless you’re an experienced surfer. Bus 100 stops nearby.

Nymphenburg Park

Add a touch of royal flair to your Munich sojourn by sweeping through the grand gardens backing Schloss Nymphenburg for free. One of the city’s most statuesque royal palaces, about 5km northwest of the city centre, it boasts various water features – including a canal that turns into an ice-skating rink in freezing winters – as well as several palace outbuildings. Of these, the frilly Amalienburg is the most noteworthy; a small admission is charged if you want to see its opulent interior. From the Hauptbahnhof (main train station), Nymphenburg is a straight shot on tram 17.

Olympian sounds

A trip out to the Olympiapark, site of the 1972 Summer Olympic Games, is always a lovely respite from the urban bustle, but especially so in the warmer months when you can time a spin around the grounds with a free concert. Throughout August, the Theatron Festival (theatron.de) brings live bands to the amphitheatre next to the Olympic Lake, playing everything from hip hop to gospel, pop to punk. Better yet, bring a blanket and a beverage and join the throngs of locals to eavesdrop on the stars from atop the Olympiaberg. The 564m-high hill just happens to be within earshot of the roofless Olympic Stadium where the likes of Beyoncé, Linkin Park and Katy Perry have hit the stage. Hop off the U-bahn at Olympiazentrum.

Alte Pinakothek

Munich's main repository of Old European Masters is crammed with all the major players that decorated canvases between the 14th and 18th centuries. This neoclassical temple was masterminded by Leo von Klenze and is a delicacy even if you can't tell your Rembrandt from your Rubens. The collection is world famous for its exceptional quality and depth, especially when it comes to German masters.

Pinakothek der Moderne

Germany's largest modern-art museum unites four significant collections under a single roof: 20th-century art, applied design from the 19th century to today, a graphics collection and an architecture museum. It's housed in a spectacular building by Stephan Braunfels, whose four-storey interior centres on a vast eye-like dome through which soft natural light filters throughout the blanched white galleries.

Neue Pinakothek

The Neue Pinakothek harbours a well-respected collection of 19th- and early-20th-century paintings and sculpture, from rococo to Jugendstil (art nouveau). All the world-famous household names get wall space here, including crowd-pleasing French impressionists such as Monet, Cézanne and Degas as well as Van Gogh, whose boldly pigmented Sunflowers (1888) radiates cheer.

Marienplatz

The epicentral heart and soul of the Altstadt, Marienplatz is a popular gathering spot and packs a lot of personality into a compact frame. It's anchored by the Mariensäule, built in 1638 to celebrate victory over Swedish forces during the Thirty Years' War. This is the busiest spot in all Munich, throngs of tourists swarming across its expanse from early morning till late at night.
 
Nightlife
In areas where the majority of nightlife in Munich are located south and West of the city. In these areas there are many places and places to have fun, drinking and dancing many different kinds, from electronic music to metal. The districts of reference for nightlife in Munich are two: Schwabing and the Glockenbachviertel.

The Schwabing is located at the University campus and is where the nightlife is more alive. The bars and clubs are located along the streets Hohenzollernstraße, Leopoldstraße and Feilitzschstraße. This is an area served by Metro to late night: the nearest underground stations to Schwabing are Universitat and Giselstrasse.

In Glockenbachviertel alternative venues are in Munich, and the neighborhood is gaining more and more popularity among the inhabitants, Thanks to the opening of new pubs and discos.

Other important places for nightlife in Munich are the Kultfabrik, a former industrial area full of disco-pubs, Gärtnerplatz, a stylish square where is a theater and other venues, and Ostbahnhof, where there is a wide choice of nightlife, between pubs, discos and restaurants.

But nightlife in Munich It's not just discos and night clubs: the famous breweries in the city are, indeed, a must-see when visiting the Bavarian capital. In historic breweries in Munich You can spend your time sipping one of the excellent local beers and live music. Among the breweries and most famous include theAugustiner and theHofbräuhaus.
Student Festivals & Parties
If there any well know/fun festivals in the city, please state them here (Eg (Lisbon):
Semana Académica (every year at mid-May)
Receção ao Caloiro - freshmen week (late September)
Food
Vorhoelzer Forum

There is a faculty for architecture at the Technical University in Munich and so it is no surprise that their university cafe is very modern and minimal, almost like you would envision an Apple cafe. The main advantage of this cafe to any other in Munich: The view over the city.
It is not easy to find but when you do, you will be rewarded with one of the best view over Munich. For non-students the prices are quite high for a student cafe (weekend brunch 15EUR, latte 3EUR) but the setting is unique and the view will compensate for it.

Tegernseer Tal Bräuhaus

Here's the problem with most old-fashioned restaurants in Munich: they’re just plain old. After it opened in mid-2013, the new Tegernseer Tal Bräuhaus jumped into pole position among classic Bavarian kitchens, serving standards like Schweinebraten mit Knödel (roast pork with dumplings) and Obatzda (cheese spread), along with lots of oompah music, lederhosen, and dirndls, in a bright new setting right in the heart of Old Town.

Hans im Glück

Named after a fairy tale, “Hans in Luck” knocks out great cocktails, DJ sets of chill-out tunes, and an array of new-school burgers topped with the likes of gorgonzola, brie, and parmesan, while the house special comes covered with peppery arugula and a tangy balsamic reduction. Part of a local mini-chain, the Schwabing district branch makes for a great stop after a day of going through the neighborhood’s cool indie shops and boutiques.

Tantris

A Teutonic titan, this red-on-black, Asian-inspired seafood champion has held at least two Michelin stars every year since 1974. Now in the hands of the founder’s son, Felix Eichbauer, Tantris remains one of the best restaurants in Germany, backing up the five-course tasting menus (€150) with its own 35,000-bottle wine cellar. For private parties, a separate room can seat up to 26 privileged players.

Augustiner Keller

Locals love their beer gardens and the Augustiner Keller ranks high in the list of the most favorite ones. More than enough outdoor seating space for everyone, delicious beer and if it rains you can sit down in their house cellar where they used to store beer back in times.Normally two words should be enough to convince you to come here: Augustiner Beer. Munich loves Augustiner Beer and you will too. It is perfectly located close to the central bus station or the train station where many hostels are located.
 
Currency
Euro
https://www.oanda.com//currency/converter/
Mobile Phone
Deutsche Telekom (formerly T-Mobile): The former market leader has still the best network, what coverage and speed is concerned. This comes at the highest prices of all 3 operators, but includes hotspot use of Germany biggest WiFi network. While 4G/LTE is only available on Telekom's own offers, its resellers only give speeds up to 3G so far and in some of their tariffs VoIP is still blocked.

Vodafone: They have a good coverage throughout the country, almost on par with Telekom given out at slightly lower prices. Like its competitor 4G/LTE is only on its own brand. All resellers stay on speeds up to 3G for now. It has the cheapest roaming offer for all EU/EEA countries (excluding Switzerland) right now selling EU voice, text and data allowances at domestic rates in packages.

O2 (with E-Plus): The newly consolidated o2 network has a good coverage and 3G speeds in towns and cities, but can't match overall coverage in the countryside for now. 4G/LTE is open on O2's own brand and on most of its resellers too. This makes it the cheapest offer with LTE in the country right now. It's the only network that covers the Berliner U-Bahn (= metro, underground, subway) in full length by both 3G and 4G/LTE.

So choose:
Telekom for the best coverage and speeds at the highest prices
Vodafone for the cheapest roaming, if you want to use it elsewhere in the EU
O2 (+ E-Plus) for the cheapest domestic rates on LTE and for using Berlin public transport
You have the choice between the network operator and one of its many resellers (MVNOs). The operator gives better support and offers LTE at higher prices, while many resellers give better rates, but stay on 3G (except o2-MVNOs) with a minimal customer support.
To obtain a good deal, data packages must be booked on the SIM card after activation. As weekly rates are hard to find, there is basically the choice of:
daily packages for short-time heavy users (available from 500 MB to 1 GB per day)
monthly packages for other users (available from 100 MB to 20 GB for 28-30 days)
Take care, that the default rate is often charged very high at around 20-30 ct per MB while data in packages are between 0.2-2 ct/MB. So buy packages right from the start, shut off data before the purchase and enable only when this has been confirmed (see here).
University
Hochschule für angewandte Wissenshaften München
Munich University of Applied Sciences
Website https://www.hm.edu/en/
Tuition Fee EU; non-EU
Autumn semester
Application deadline Application deadline
Beginning of October Middle of March
Spring semester
Application deadline Application deadline
Middle of March Beginning of October
Campus Facilities
IEM department 09\nThe campus at Lothstra\u00dfe is the heart of the university. It is the home of the engineering departments, the departments of Design, General and Interdisciplinary Studies, and Tourism, as well as the university administration. \n\nAs parking in the vicinity of Munich University is limited, we recommend the use of public transport. You can reach the University sites from M\u00fcnchen Hauptbahnhof (central station) using the following services:\n\nLothstra\u00dfe Campus (dept. 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 09, 13)\nTake the tram lines 20 (Moosach Bf.), 21 (Westfriedhof) or 22 (Hochschule M\u00fcnchen) to the stop \"Hochschule M\u00fcnchen (Lothstra\u00dfe)\".\n\nLothstra\u00dfe Campus (dept. 12)\nTake the tram lines 20 (Moosach Bf.), 21 (Westfriedhof) or 22 (Hochschule M\u00fcnchen) to the stop \"Leonrodplatz\". Here, change to tram line 12 (Scheidplatz) or the MetroBus 53 (M\u00fcnchner Freiheit) to the stop \"Infanteriestra\u00dfe\".\n\nAlternatively, take the U2 (Feldmoching) to the stop \"Hohenzollernplatz\" and from there take the city bus 144 (Ackermannbogen) to the stop \"Infanteriestra\u00dfe\".\n\nLothstra\u00dfe Campus (dept. 14)\nTake the tram lines 20 (Moosach Bf.), 21 (Westfriedhof) or 22 (Hochschule M\u00fcnchen) to the stop \"Hochschule M\u00fcnchen (Lothstra\u00dfe)\". From there, follow Dachauer Stra\u00dfe north on foot, turn left onto Lazarettstra\u00dfe, right onto Heldstra\u00dfe, left onto Pf\u00e4nderstra\u00dfe and then left onto Schachenmeierstra\u00dfe and continue until you reach the University.\n\nAlternatively, take the U1 (Olympia-Einkaufszentrum) to the stop \"Maillingerstra\u00dfe\". From there, walk along Nymphenburgerstra\u00dfe and turn right onto Lazarettstra\u00dfe, left onto Ernst-Henle-Stra\u00dfe along the allotment gardens and then turn left again onto Schachenmeierstra\u00dfe and continue until you reach the University.\n\n\nPasing campus \nThe Pasing campus with its leafy courtyards and historic buildings is situated in the western part of Munich and hosts the departments of Business Administration and Applied Social Sciences. \n\nKarlstra\u00dfe campus \nThe Campus at Karlstra\u00dfe is located in Munich's museum district and houses the departments of Architecture, Civil Engineering and Geoinformatics in a historic building and architectural highlight from the 1950s. "}" rowspan="1" style="padding: 0px 3px; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-right-style: solid; border-right-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); border-bottom-style: solid; border-bottom-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); border-left-style: solid; border-left-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: Arial; font-size: 110%; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); word-wrap: break-word; vertical-align: middle;"> MUAS's departments are spread over three large sites in Munich. As well as each having their individual flair, each of the campuses has its own cafeteria and library.

Lothstraße campus > IEM department 09
The campus at Lothstraße is the heart of the university. It is the home of the engineering departments, the departments of Design, General and Interdisciplinary Studies, and Tourism, as well as the university administration.

As parking in the vicinity of Munich University is limited, we recommend the use of public transport. You can reach the University sites from München Hauptbahnhof (central station) using the following services:

Lothstraße Campus (dept. 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 09, 13)
Take the tram lines 20 (Moosach Bf.), 21 (Westfriedhof) or 22 (Hochschule München) to the stop "Hochschule München (Lothstraße)".

Lothstraße Campus (dept. 12)
Take the tram lines 20 (Moosach Bf.), 21 (Westfriedhof) or 22 (Hochschule München) to the stop "Leonrodplatz". Here, change to tram line 12 (Scheidplatz) or the MetroBus 53 (Münchner Freiheit) to the stop "Infanteriestraße".

Alternatively, take the U2 (Feldmoching) to the stop "Hohenzollernplatz" and from there take the city bus 144 (Ackermannbogen) to the stop "Infanteriestraße".

Lothstraße Campus (dept. 14)
Take the tram lines 20 (Moosach Bf.), 21 (Westfriedhof) or 22 (Hochschule München) to the stop "Hochschule München (Lothstraße)". From there, follow Dachauer Straße north on foot, turn left onto Lazarettstraße, right onto Heldstraße, left onto Pfänderstraße and then left onto Schachenmeierstraße and continue until you reach the University.

Alternatively, take the U1 (Olympia-Einkaufszentrum) to the stop "Maillingerstraße". From there, walk along Nymphenburgerstraße and turn right onto Lazarettstraße, left onto Ernst-Henle-Straße along the allotment gardens and then turn left again onto Schachenmeierstraße and continue until you reach the University.


Pasing campus
The Pasing campus with its leafy courtyards and historic buildings is situated in the western part of Munich and hosts the departments of Business Administration and Applied Social Sciences.

Karlstraße campus
The Campus at Karlstraße is located in Munich's museum district and houses the departments of Architecture, Civil Engineering and Geoinformatics in a historic building and architectural highlight from the 1950s.
Studies
Language of instruction: German \nSpecialisation: Industrial Engineering; Biotechnology and Environmental Technology; Information Technology\nAutomotive Engineering and Management (B.Eng.) > Language of instruction: German\nLogistics Engineering and Management (B.Eng.) > Language of instruction: German \n\nMaster's Prgrammes:\nEngineering and Management (M.Eng., full-time) > Language of instruction: German \nBusiness Administration and Engineering (MBA&Eng., part-time) > Language of instruction: German \n\n"}" rowspan="1" style="padding: 0px 3px; background-color: rgb(239, 239, 239); border-right-style: solid; border-right-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); border-bottom-style: solid; border-bottom-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); border-left-style: solid; border-left-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: Arial; font-size: 110%; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); word-wrap: break-word; vertical-align: middle;"> Bachelor's Programmes:
Engineering and Management (B.Eng.) > Language of instruction: German
Specialisation: Industrial Engineering; Biotechnology and Environmental Technology; Information Technology
Automotive Engineering and Management (B.Eng.) > Language of instruction: German
Logistics Engineering and Management (B.Eng.) > Language of instruction: German

Master's Prgrammes:
Engineering and Management (M.Eng., full-time) > Language of instruction: German
Business Administration and Engineering (MBA&Eng., part-time) > Language of instruction: German
 
Scholarships
Pleas check out:
https://www.hm.edu/en/course_offerings/course_offerings_overview/index.en.html
University contacts
International Office:
+49 89 1265-1141
nina.kohr@hm.edu
IEM Department:
+49 89 1265-3901
sekretariat.wi@hm.edu
Contacts
Local Group
To get in contact with ESTIEM Local Group Munich, please contact our Local Responsible through the e-mail lr.munich@estiem.org
Student Guide
If you find any broken links or wish to give feedback related to the Student Guide Pages, please contact pages.studentguide@estiem.org